Relationship Between Mindfulness and Non-Suicidal Self-Injury

This research explored whether lack of mindfulness or problems in mindfulness are involved in self-injury.

Non-suicidal self-injury is a complex behaviour, disturbingly prevalent, difficult to treat and with possible adverse outcomes in the long term. Previous research has shown individuals most commonly self-injure to cope with overwhelming negative emotions. Mindfulness has been shown to be associated with emotion regulation, and mindfulness-based interventions have shown effectiveness in a wide range of psychological disorders.

Pairwise comparisons revealed current self-injurers reported significantly lower mindfulness than past self-injurers and non-self-injurers, with medium effect sizes of d = 0.51 and d = 0.77, respectively. In logistic regression, low mindfulness significantly predicted self-injury (B = 0.04, p < .001). These findings have clinical implications, suggesting that mindfulness-based interventions may assist individuals to give up self-injurious behaviours and may be an important part of prevention strategies.

Full reference: Caltabiano, G. & Martin, G. (2017) Mindless Suffering: the Relationship Between Mindfulness and Non-Suicidal Self-Injury. Mindfulness. 8(788)

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Digital educational programme on nurses’ knowledge, confidence and attitudes in providing care for children and young people who have self-harmed

Manning, J.C. (2017) BMJ Open. 7:e014750.

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Objectives:

(1) To determine the impact of a digital educational intervention on the knowledge, attitudes, confidence and behavioural intention of registered children’s nurses working with children and young people (CYP) admitted with self-harm.

(2) To explore the perceived impact, suitability and usefulness of the intervention.

Intervention: A digital educational intervention that had been co-produced with CYP service users, registered children’s nurses and academics.

Conclusions: The effect of the intervention is promising and demonstrates the potential it has in improving registered children’s nurse’s knowledge, confidence and attitudes. However, further testing is required to confirm this.

Read the full article here

Nursing attitudes to deliberate self-harm

Carswell, C. & Noble, H. BMJ Evidence-Based Nursing blog. Published online: 6 February 2017

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Attitudes can have a significant effect on behaviour meaning that the attitudes nurses hold can have an impact on their nursing practice. Patients who self-harm report high levels of stigma and negative attitudes, stating that they have been called ‘attention seeking’ or ‘manipulative’ as a result of the self-injurious behaviour. The text Blades, Blood and Bandages tells the stories of 25 people’s experiences of self-injury and investigates how those who self-injure are ‘affected by suffering, ritual and stigma’ http://www.palgrave.com/br/book/9780230252813

These negative attitudes and beliefs have originated from not only their friends and family, but also from medical professionals and emergency department personnel following presentation for their injuries. These attitudes can be interpreted through the professional’s behaviour and can have a profound effect on the patient. They can determine whether the patient decides to stay in the hospital for assessment, treatment or referral and whether they are instilled with a sense of hope and validation which in turn can help reduce the risk of further incidents of self-harm and even suicide. Attitudes can also have a more direct impact on nursing practice, for example nurses may feel unequipped or unprepared to perform a comprehensive assessment or to refer on to specialist mental health services.

Read the full blog post here

Relationship Between Predictors of Incident Deliberate Self-Harm and Suicide Attempts

Huang, Y-S. et al. Journal of Adolescent Health. Published online: 31 January 2017

Purpose: Data on the incidence of deliberate self-harm (DSH) and suicide attempts (SAs) are lacking in non-Western adolescents, and no studies have investigated differences in incident DSH and SA worldwide. This study aimed to investigate the incidence rates and relationships between predictors in DSH and SA.

Conclusions: The incidence rates of DSH and SA were similar to those reported in Western countries. The predictors of incident DSH and SA were similar but not identical. Our results highlight the risk factors which should be considered in terms of early identification and intervention among adolescents to prevent suicidality.

Read the full abstract here

Temperament and character traits in female adolescents with nonsuicidal self-injury disorder

Tschan, T. et al. (2017) Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health. 11:4

Background: Temperament and character traits of adolescents with nonsuicidal self-injury disorder (NSSI) might differentiate those- with and without comorbid borderline personality disorder (BPD).

Results: Adolescents with NSSI disorder scored significantly higher on novelty seeking and harm avoidance and lower on persistence, self-directedness, and cooperativeness than CC. The NSSI + BPD group scored even higher than the NSSI − BPD group on novelty seeking and harm avoidance and lower on persistence and cooperativeness (d ≥ 0.72). Adolescents with NSSI reported higher levels of impulsivity than the CC and NC group. However, this difference was not found in a Go/NoGo task.

Conclusions: The results provide further evidence for a distinct diagnostic entity of NSSI disorder.

Read the full article here

How parents of young people who self-harm experience support and treatment

Stewart, A. et al. Child and Adolescent Mental Health. Published online: 19 December 2016

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Background: Self-harm in young people is a common reason for contact with clinical services. However, there is little research focusing on parents’ perspectives of care following self-harm. The aim of this study was to explore parents’ experiences of treatment and support for the young person and for themselves.

 

Conclusions: Parents’ views highlight the need for clinicians to consider carefully the perspective of parents, involving them wherever possible and providing practical help and support, including written information. The need for training of clinicians in communicating with young people and parents following self-harm is also highlighted.

Read the full abstract here

Association between bullying behavior, perceived school safety, and self-cutting

Hamada, S et al. Child and Adolescent Mental Health. Published online: 25 November 2016

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Background: No previous population-based studies have examined associations between self-cutting, perceived school safety, and bullying behavior among East Asian adolescents.

Conclusions: Self-cutting among Japanese adolescents was linked with bullying behavior and feeling unsafe at school. Secure school environments and school-based antibullying programs could help to prevent adolescent self-injurious behavior.

Read the full abstract here