Voluntary, Community and Social Enterprise (VCSE) health and wellbeing fund 2019 to 2020: how to apply

Department of Health and Social Care | November 2018 | VCSE health and wellbeing fund 2019 to 2020: how to apply

Voluntary, Community and Social Enterprise (VCSE) organisations can apply for funding to run projects focused on improving children and young people’s mental health.

The Department of Health and Social Care is inviting applications from existing schemes to trial a new approach to helping children and young people with their mental health. The deadline for applications is midday on Friday 15 February 2019.

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Projects should:

  • adopt community and person-centred approaches to improving the mental health of children and young people aged 0 to 25 years
  • particularly support children and young people through life-changing events
  • have strong local connections already in place
  • be delivered by the VCSE sector
  • be co-produced with service users and stakeholders

Through this programme, the Department of Health and Social Care, NHS England and Public Health England are working with VCSE organisations to promote equality, address health inequalities and support the wellbeing of people, families and communities (Source: Department of Health and Social Care).

Through this programme, the Department of Health and Social Care, NHS England and Public Health England are working with VCSE organisations to promote equality, address health inequalities and support the wellbeing of people, families and communities (Source: Department of Health and Social Care).

Health and wellbeing fund 2019 to 2020: application form

Health and wellbeing fund 2019 to 2020: information pack

Health and wellbeing fund 2019 to 2020: budget template

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Fair Funding For Mental Health

Fair Funding For Mental Health: Putting Parity Into Practice | Institute for Public Policy Research (IPPR)

The NHS is currently in the process of writing a long-term plan that will set out what it wants to achieve with additional funding and how this funding will be allocated. This report argues that it is crucial that this plan raises our ambitions on mental health, what parity of esteem looks like and how much it will cost to get there.

The report states the NHS must scale up access to – and improve the quality of care – across all areas of treatment. In consultation with the sector, the authors identify the following themes that the long-term plan must address:

  • more investment in early intervention for children and young people (CAMHS)
  • scale up access to treatment for common mental health conditions such as
    depression and anxiety including through Improving Access to Psychological
    Therapies (IAPT)
  • provide universal high-quality community care for people severely affected
    with conditions such as psychosis, bipolar disorder, personality disorder and
    eating disorders
  • provide universal high-quality liaison and 24/7 crisis care for people living with
    poor mental health
  • reduce inpatient admissions, with more people treated in the community and
    supported at an earlier stage of their condition
  • set up a Mental Health Innovation Fund (MHIF) to spread best practise across
    the system.

 

Children and young people’s mental health – policy, CAMHS services, funding and education

House of Commons Library |August 2018 |Children and young people’s mental health – policy, CAMHS services, funding and education

The House of Commons Library has issued a new briefing paper on Children and young people’s mental health – policy, CAMHS services, funding and education.

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The  press release from the House of Commons Library  can also be read here 

Challenges facing mental health and wellbeing services for children

This guide provides an overview of the challenges facing mental health and wellbeing services for children and young people | Local Government Association

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Image source: https://www.local.gov.uk/

At least one in 10 children and young people are affected by mental health problems, and the unreported figures are likely to be even higher. Young people are increasingly struggling with problems like anxiety, depression and self-harm, with nearly 19,000 young people admitted to hospital after harming themselves in 2015 – a 14 per cent rise over three years. This guide provides an overview of the challenges facing mental health and wellbeing services for children and young people.

 

Full report: Don’t be left in the dark: children and young people’s mental health

Transforming children and young people’s mental health

Ways for schools and colleges to support pupils’ mental health are set out in a green paper, as well as plans for new mental health support teams.

The government has published proposals to improve mental health support for children and young people in England. Over £300 million has been made available to fund them.

The government is asking people for their views on the planned measures, which are set out in a green paper. The measures include:

  • encouraging every school and college to have a ‘designated senior mental health lead’
  • setting up mental health support teams working with schools, to give children and young people earlier access to services
  • piloting a 4-week waiting time for NHS children and young people’s mental health services

Other proposals in the green paper include:

  • a new working group to look at mental health support for 16 to 25-year-olds
  • a report by the Chief Medical Officer on the impact that technology has on children and young people’s mental health, to be produced in 2018

The consultation on the green paper will run for 13 weeks until 2 March 2018.

Full document: Transforming children and young people’s mental health provision: a green paper

This short video describes the main proposals in the green paper.

New research shows the benefit of bullying interventions in schools

Study explores the long-term social and economic impact of effective bullying interventions implemented in primary schools.

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MQ: Transforming Mental Health have published a report which finds that the implementation of evidence-based school bullying interventions could prevent over 24,000 cases of bullying each year.  This would significantly improve the mental health of thousands of young people, and save the UK economy £348 million per year group. This represents a  return on investment for £146 for every £1 invested in implementing a proven model.

The economic model uses data from the 1958 Birth Cohort on outcomes associated with childhood bullying to estimate the potential short- and long-term benefits of effective anti-bullying interventions in schools.

The report highlights that with such clear evidence pointing to the link between bullying and mental illness, it’s vital that schools receive support from both the government and public funding to rollout evidence-based schemes to tackle it.

Full report: The Economic Case for Prevention in Young People’s Mental Health: Bullying Personal Social Services Research Unit (PSSRU) | London School of Economics and Political Science | MQ: Transforming Mental Health

Funding of children and young people’s services

Turning the tide: reversing the move to late intervention spending in children and young people’s services. | The National Children’s Bureau | The Children’s Society |  Action for Children

This report looks at current funding and spending across children and young people’s services.  It finds councils no longer have the resources to fund early intervention services and suggests that this is likely to increase demand for more costly ‘late’ interventions.

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Image source: http://www.ncb.org.uk

The report looks at current funding and spend right across children and young people’s services, and  provides an estimate of how much councils are receiving for children and young people’s services and where this is being allocated.