Children’s Mental Health Funding Not Going Where it Should

YoungMinds analysis reveals that many local health bodies are diverting some of the new funding received for children’s mental health services to other priorities.

In 2015, the government pledged an extra £1.4 billion over five years to “transform” Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS). Research undertaken by YoungMinds into the responses of 199 Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs) from Freedom of Information requests has revealed that:

  • Fewer than half of the CCGs who responded were able to provide full information about their CAMHS budgets. If CAMHS services are to improve, there needs to be far greater accountability about where money is being spent.
  • In the first year of extra funding (2015-16), only 36% of CCGs who responded increased their CAMHS spend to reflect their additional government funds. Nearly two-thirds (64%) of CCGs used some or all of the extra money to backfill cuts or to spend on other priorities.
  • In the second year of extra funding (2016-17), only half of CCGs (50%) who responded increased their CAMHS spend to reflect their additional government funds. The other half (50%) are using some or all of the extra money for other priorities.

Read the full news story here

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How parents of young people who self-harm experience support and treatment

Stewart, A. et al. Child and Adolescent Mental Health. Published online: 19 December 2016

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Background: Self-harm in young people is a common reason for contact with clinical services. However, there is little research focusing on parents’ perspectives of care following self-harm. The aim of this study was to explore parents’ experiences of treatment and support for the young person and for themselves.

 

Conclusions: Parents’ views highlight the need for clinicians to consider carefully the perspective of parents, involving them wherever possible and providing practical help and support, including written information. The need for training of clinicians in communicating with young people and parents following self-harm is also highlighted.

Read the full abstract here

The Transition From Thinness-Oriented to Muscularity-Oriented Disordered Eating in Adolescent Males

Murray, S.B. et al. Journal of Adolescent Health. Published online: 16 December 2016

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Purpose: Robust empirical evidence has illustrated a rising prevalence of body dissatisfaction and disordered eating among males, noting that both may be oriented more toward muscularity—as opposed to thinness-oriented concerns. While an elevated prevalence of premorbid anorexia nervosa (AN) has been noted among those with muscle dysmorphia, little evidence has examined the process of this transition from thinness-oriented to muscularity-oriented disordered eating.

 

Conclusions: Transdiagnostic crossover between thinness-oriented and muscularity-oriented disordered eating represents an important clinical concern, which may be challenging to measure and assess. Implications for treatment are discussed, and the early detection of muscularity-oriented disordered eating.

Read the full abstract here

Mental Health Disparities Among Canadian Transgender Youth

Veale, J.F. et al. (2017) Journal of Adolescent Health. 60(1) pp. 44–49

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Purpose: This study documented the prevalence of mental health problems among transgender youth in Canada and made comparisons with population-based studies. This study also compared gender identity subgroups and age subgroups (14–18 and 19–25).

Conclusions: Although a notable minority of transgender youth did not report negative health outcomes, this study shows the mental health disparities faced by transgender youth in Canada are considerable.

Read the full article here

Social media shots affect body image because we only show our best side

Fardouly, J. et al. The Conversation. Published online: 16 December 2016

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Many modern celebrities are known for being excessive sharers on social media. For instance, the Kardashians are notorious for posting daily glamorous and often lingerie clad images on Instagram that attract several million likes.

But it’s not just images of attractive celebrities that flood social media. Friends, acquaintances and strangers post images of themselves too, often editing them to disguise face blemishes, make cheeks rosier or to make their nose look smaller.

When people look at these attractive images on social media, research shows they often compare their own appearance to those images and think they’re less attractive than the images they see.

Read the full blog post here

 

Rise in children hospitalised for self-harm

Nearly 19,000 children and young people in England and Wales were hospitalised for self-harm last year | NSPCC

This marks an increase of almost 2,400 (14%) in the past 3 years.

The worrying figures were obtained by NSPCC Freedom of Information Request (FOI) to NHS Trusts, and highlight the crisis many young people face as they struggle to cope with the pressures of modern day life.

Childline delivered over 18,471 counselling sessions about self-harm last year, making it one of the most common reasons for children and young people to reach out for support.

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Information source: NSPCC

 

Read the full news story here

Read NSPCC advice for parents about why children and young people self-harm, how to spot the signs and what you can do to help here

 

Improving the mental health of children and young people

Reports to support commissioners in improving the mental health and wellbeing of children and young people. | Public Health England

These reports describe the importance of mental health and wellbeing among children and young people and the case for investment in mental health. They also summarise the evidence of what works to improve mental health among children and young people in order to inform local transformation of services.

The mental health of children and young people in England

The mental health of children and young people in London

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Image source: http://www.gov.uk