Big rise in male hospital admissions due to eating disorders

An analysis of NHS Digital data by The Guardian shows the number of men being hospitalised with an eating disorder has risen by 70% since 2011 | OnMedica

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It reveals that the number of hospital diagnoses in male over-19s rose from 480 in 2010-2011 to 818 between April 2015 and March 2016.

The rate of increase was slightly higher among older men, at 70% for the 41-60 age group, compared with 67% in the 26-40 category and 63% among 19- to 25-year-olds. In the same period, there was a 61% increase among women aged 19 to 25 and a 76% rise among middle-aged women.

Dr William Rhys Jones, from the Royal College of Psychiatrists’ eating disorders faculty, told the newspaper that pressure for body perfection is on the rise for men of all ages, which is a risk factor for developing an eating disorder. “Images of unhealthy male body ideals in the media place unnecessary pressure on vulnerable people who strive for acceptance through the way they look.”

Read the full commentary here

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The paediatrician’s role in mental health

Mental health is increasingly acknowledged as an integral part of a paediatrician’s work. This article aims to cover six important areas that will be useful to the general paediatrician | Paediatrics and Child Health

In the first part of the article I will tackle: why mental health is an important part of paediatric care, what kind of mental health difficulties do children encounter and how should paediatricians initially approach emotional and behavioural problems? In the second part I will describe the emotional problems encountered in paediatric services, how to understand behavioural problems and how to manage both of these in paediatric practice. Practical approaches and advice are provided in each section.

Full reference: Davie, M. (2017) The paediatrician’s role in mental health. Paediatrics and Child Health. Published online: 28 July 2017

CAMHS: learning from case reviews

Summary of risk factors and learning for improved practice for child and adolescent mental health services | NSPCC

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Child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS) practitioners have a key role to play helping children and young people rebuild their lives following difficult early experiences such as abuse and neglect. However organisational and operational challenges can result in many vulnerable young people not receiving the help they need when they need it.

The learning from these case reviews highlights these difficulties as well as emerging good practice to resolve these issues.

Read the key issues for CAMHS in case reviews here

Suicide by Children and Young People

Suicide in young people is rarely caused by one thing; it usually follows a combination of previous vulnerability and recent events | University of Manchester

The stresses we have identified before suicide are common in young people; most come through them without serious harm.

Important themes for suicide prevention are support for or management of family factors (e.g. mental illness, physical illness, or substance misuse), childhood abuse, bullying, physical health, social isolation, mental ill-health and alcohol or drug misuse.

Specific actions are needed on groups we have highlighted:

  1. support for young people who are bereaved, especially by suicide
  2. greater priority for mental health in colleges and universities
  3. housing and mental health care for looked after children
  4. mental health support for LGBT young people.

Read the full report here

Very preterm birth not associated with mood & anxiety disorders

Do very-preterm or very-low-weight babies develop anxiety and mood disorders later in life? Researchers have concluded a study to answer this question | ScienceDaily

The team studied nearly 400 individuals from birth to adulthood. Half of the participants had been born before 32 weeks gestation or at a very low birth weight (less than 3.3 pounds), and the other half had been born at term and normal birth weight. They assessed each participant when they were 6, 8 and 26 years old using detailed clinical interviews of psychiatric disorders.

“Previous research has reported increased risks for anxiety and mood disorders, but these studies were based on small samples and did not include repeated assessments for over 20 years,”

Their results? At age 6, children were not at an increased risk of any anxiety or mood disorders, but by age 8 — after they had entered school — more children had an anxiety disorder. By 26, there was a tendency to have more mood disorders like depression, but the findings were not meaningfully different between the two groups.

This study is the first investigation of anxiety and mood disorders in childhood and adulthood using clinical diagnoses in a large whole-population study of very preterm and very-low-birth-weight individuals as compared to individuals born at term.

The team also found that having a romantic partner who is supportive is an important factor for good mental health because it helps protect one from developing anxiety or depression. However, the study found fewer very-preterm-born adults had a romantic partner and were more withdrawn socially.

Children and teens let down by mental health inpatient services in England

Inpatient provision for children and young people with mental health problems. Emily Frith | Education Policy Institute | via OnMedica

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Image source: epi.org.uk

A report from the Education Policy Institute has found that 12% of  child mental health inpatient units failed to meet basic requirements for staff to patient ratios.

Nearly a quarter (24%) of units struggle to employ permanent staff – up from 17% since 2014/15. Temporary bank and agency staff make up 19% of child mental health inpatient pay costs.

Staff shortages affect the quality of patient care, so a sustained focus on recruitment of skilled staff to work in child and adolescent mental health services is needed, recommends the report.

The report also found:

  • inpatient mental health services for young people on average fail to meet 7% of minimum quality of care standards
  • The issue of bed shortages can mean that children with mental health problems are admitted to adult wards
  • Eating disorders were the most common reason for a young person being admitted to hospital in 2015/16
  • Young people are being left in hospital for longer than necessary due to a lack of community services with the trend getting worse – the number of delayed discharge days in December 2016 – February 2017 42% higher than in the same period the previous year

Full story at OnMedica

Download full report: Inpatient provision for children and young people with mental health problems.

Male eating disorders rise

There has been an increase across the UK of men and boys suffering from eating disorders, according to research by BBC Panorama | BBC News

There has also been a rise in the number of under-18s seeking help. But less is spent on services to treat people of both genders with eating disorders in Wales than in England, a BBC Wales investigation found.

The UK’s largest eating disorder charity, Beat, said people with eating disorders “deserved better”. Panorama investigated the scale of the problem across the UK by asking every mental health trust and board how many men were referred to eating disorder services for a first assessment. From those that responded, it showed in 2016 there were 871 referrals, an increase from 2014 of 43%.

It also found a 42% rise in under-18s of both genders receiving help in 2016 compared to 2014, as well as a postcode lottery when it came to waiting times with lengths varying from less than a week to almost a year.

Read the full news story here