Voluntary, Community and Social Enterprise (VCSE) health and wellbeing fund 2019 to 2020: how to apply

Department of Health and Social Care | November 2018 | VCSE health and wellbeing fund 2019 to 2020: how to apply

Voluntary, Community and Social Enterprise (VCSE) organisations can apply for funding to run projects focused on improving children and young people’s mental health.

The Department of Health and Social Care is inviting applications from existing schemes to trial a new approach to helping children and young people with their mental health. The deadline for applications is midday on Friday 15 February 2019.

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Projects should:

  • adopt community and person-centred approaches to improving the mental health of children and young people aged 0 to 25 years
  • particularly support children and young people through life-changing events
  • have strong local connections already in place
  • be delivered by the VCSE sector
  • be co-produced with service users and stakeholders

Through this programme, the Department of Health and Social Care, NHS England and Public Health England are working with VCSE organisations to promote equality, address health inequalities and support the wellbeing of people, families and communities (Source: Department of Health and Social Care).

Through this programme, the Department of Health and Social Care, NHS England and Public Health England are working with VCSE organisations to promote equality, address health inequalities and support the wellbeing of people, families and communities (Source: Department of Health and Social Care).

Health and wellbeing fund 2019 to 2020: application form

Health and wellbeing fund 2019 to 2020: information pack

Health and wellbeing fund 2019 to 2020: budget template

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2018 CAMHS Project – Results published

NHS Benchmarking Network | November 2018 | 2018 CAMHS Project – Results published.

Within community CAMHS, sustained increases in demand have been demonstrated through increased referral rates which have reached their highest ever level this year. Referral acceptance rates have also increased, along with conversion rates for young people who subsequently enter treatment. However, although increased capacity has been demonstrated, demand continues to outstrip supply with increases in young people on waiting lists to access CAMHS and waiting times longer than the previous year.

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Incident rates continue to show variation between providers, and these can be explored further in the CAMHS toolkit. Rates of ligature incidents and use of restraint in particular remain areas for concern, as these rates are notably higher than those reported by adult inpatient mental health wards (Source: NHS Benchmarking Network).

Further details available from NHS Benchmarking Network 

Related: 2018 Mental Health Project – Results published

Children of the millennium

Children of the millennium: understanding the course of conduct problems during childhood | The Centre for Health Economics | University College London Institute of Education  

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Image source: http://www.centreformentalhealth.org.uk

This report presents an analysis of the Millennium Cohort Study which follows the lives of children born in 2000 and 2001.  The report finds that one child in every twelve in the UK has behavioural problems from a young age into their teenage years and calls for the government, NHS, schools and local authorities to do more to support children with persistent behavioural problems.

Children with persistent problems are much more likely to have a multitude of risks early in life, including poverty and housing insecurity, parental mental illness and developmental delay.

 

The report calls for:

  • Government to seek to reduce child poverty and housing insecurity
  • The NHS to continue to boost mental health support to new parents
  • Local authorities to get the funding they need to boost early years services such as Sure Start and to offer evidence-based parenting programmes to families with the greatest needs.

Full document: Children of the millenium: Understanding the course of conduct problems during childhood | Centre for Mental Health

Additional link: Centre for Mental Health press release

Happy childhood memories linked to better health later in life

People who have fond memories of childhood, specifically their relationships with their parents, tend to have better health, less depression and fewer chronic illnesses as older adultsHealth Psychology | via ScienceDaily

Research published by the American Psychological Association examined data from two nationally representative samples, the National Survey of Midlife Development in the United States and the Health and Retirement Study, with a total of more than 22,000 participants. The first study followed adults in their mid-40s for 18 years and the second followed adults 50 and over for six years. The surveys included questions about perceptions of parental affection, overall health, chronic conditions and depressive symptoms.

Participants in both groups who reported remembering higher levels of affection from their mothers in early childhood experienced better physical health and fewer depressive symptoms later in life. Those who reported memories with more support from their fathers also experienced fewer depressive symptoms.

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Journal abstract:

Objective: Perceptions of early caregiving experiences are hypothesized to be influential across the life span. However, previous research testing this hypothesis focuses primarily on young adults and use mostly cross-sectional designs. The current study examined associations between memories of early caregiving experiences and trajectories of depressive symptoms and physical health in 2 large samples of middle-aged and older adults.

Method: Sample 1 consisted of participants from the National Survey of Midlife Development in the United States (n = 7,108) followed for 18 years (from 1995/1996 until 2013/2014). Sample 2 consisted of participants from the Health and Retirement Study (n = 15,234) followed over a 6-year period. Memories of caregiver support before age 18 were retrospectively assessed in middle and older adulthood; associations between these memories and changes in self-rated health, chronic health conditions, and depressive symptoms over time were examined.

Results: Memories of higher parental affection in early childhood were associated with better self-rated health and lower depressive symptoms over intervals of approximately 6 and 18 years, in both samples; the results for chronic health conditions was more mixed. These associations persisted over time and were not moderated by time.

Conclusion: Associations between perceptions of caregiver support and health persisted over time, underscoring the importance of memories of close relationships for health and depressive symptoms across the life span, even into late life. Findings are discussed in relation to models that link perceptions of early life experiences to later life outcomes

Full reference: William J. Chopik and Robin S. Edelstein | Retrospective Memories of Parental Care and Health from Mid to Late Life | Health Psychology | 2018

Further information at ScienceDaily

CBT most effective for anxiety disorders in children and young people

University of Oxford | November 2018 | Group therapy most effective treatment for anxiety in young people

Talking therapy or group cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) has been shown to be the most effective psychotherapy in reducing symptoms of anxiety  in children and adolescents.  University of Oxford researchers used a meta-analysis to answer the question: What is the best psychotherapeutic approach for anxiety disorders in children and adolescents in terms of efficacy and acceptability? Their study included 101 unique randomized clinical trials (approximately 7,000 participants) that compared any structured psychotherapy with another psychotherapy or a control condition for anxiety disorders in children and adolescents.

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The meta analysis found that CBT, was significantly beneficial compared with placebo or waiting list in terms of improving children’s and adolescent’s quality of life and functional improvement (Source: University of Oxford).    

The findings have now been published in JAMA Psychiatry 

Abstract
Importance  Anxiety disorders are common in children and adolescents, and uncertainty remains regarding the optimal strategy of psychotherapies in this population.

Objective  To compare and rank the different types of psychotherapies and the different ways of delivering psychological treatments for anxiety disorders in children and adolescents.

Data Sources  PubMed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Web of Science, CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature), ProQuest Dissertations, LILACS (Literatura Latino Americana em Ciências da Saúde), international trial registers, and US Food and Drug Administration reports were searched from inception to November 30, 2017.

Study Selection  Randomized clinical trials that compared any structured psychotherapy with another psychotherapy or a control condition for anxiety disorders in children and adolescents were selected.

Data Extraction and Synthesis  Four researchers independently performed data extraction and quality assessment. Pairwise meta-analyses and Bayesian network meta-analysis within the random-effects model were used to synthesize data.

Main Outcomes and Measures  Efficacy (change in anxiety symptoms) posttreatment and at follow-up, acceptability (all-cause discontinuation), and quality of life and functional improvement were measured. The certainty of evidence was assessed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation framework.

Results  A total of 101 unique trials including 6625 unique participants compared 11 different psychotherapies with 4 specific control conditions. The certainty of evidence was rated as low or very low for most comparisons. For efficacy, most psychotherapies were significantly more effective than the wait list condition posttreatment  and at the longest follow-up. However, only group cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) was significantly more effective than the other psychotherapies and all control conditions posttreatment. For acceptability, bibliotherapy CBT had significantly more all-cause discontinuations than some psychotherapies and control conditions (range of odds ratios, 2.48-9.32). In terms of quality of life and functional improvement, CBT (delivered in different ways) was significantly beneficial compared with psychological placebo and the wait list condition.

Conclusions and Relevance  Group CBT would be the more appropriate choice of psychotherapy for anxiety disorders in children and adolescents, based on these findings. Other types of psychotherapies and different ways of delivering psychological treatment can be alternative options. Further research is needed to explore specific anxiety disorders, disorder-specific psychotherapy, and moderators of treatment effect.

Read the paper at JAMA Psychiatry 

Screen time does not impact sleep in children, finds study

Science Daily | November 2018 |Children’s sleep not significantly affected by screen time, new study finds

Earlier research has suggested that between 50 and 90 per cent of school- age children might not be getting enough sleep, citing digital technologies as a potential contributor to this. Now research findings from the Oxford Internet Institute at the University of Oxford, indicate that screen time has a modest impact on child’s sleep. The research team used data from the United States’ 2016 National Survey of Children’s Health, which included parents from across the country whom completed self-report surveys on themselves, their children and household. The survey included questions that required caregivers to estimate their child/ren’s sleep duration over one day, if their child/ren went to bed at approximately the same time each night and the amount of time spent on digital screens (including mobile phones, computers, handheld video games and other electronic devices). 

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Although the study found a correlation, the lead researcher, Professor Andrew Przybylski, author of the study published in the Journal of Pediatrics explains it is modest. “The findings suggest that the relationship between sleep and screen use in children is extremely modest. Every hour of screen time was related to 3 to 8 fewer minutes of sleep a night.” (Via Science Daily)

Read the news story in full from Science Daily Children’s sleep not significantly affected by screen time, new study finds

Abstract

Objectives

To determine the extent to which time spent with digital devices predicts meaningful variability in pediatric sleep.


Study design

Following a preregistered analysis plan, data from a sample of American children (n = 50 212) derived from the 2016 National Survey of Children’s Health were analyzed. Models adjusted for child-, caregiver-, household-, and community-level covariates to estimate the potential effects of digital screen use.

Results

Each hour devoted to digital screens was associated with 3-8 fewer minutes of nightly sleep and significantly lower levels of sleep consistency. Furthermore, those children who complied with 2010 and 2016 American Academy of Pediatrics guidance on screen time limits reported between 20 and 26 more minutes, respectively, of nightly sleep. However, links between digital screen time and pediatric sleep outcomes were modest, accounting for less than 1.9% of observed variability in sleep outcomes.

Conclusions

Digital screen time, on its own, has little practical effect on pediatric sleep. Contextual factors surrounding screen time exert a more pronounced influence on pediatric sleep compared to screen time itself. These findings provide an empirically robust template for those investigating the digital displacement hypothesis as well as informing policy-making.

 

Full reference: Przybylski, Andrew K. | 2018| Digital Screen Time and Pediatric Sleep: Evidence from a Preregistered Cohort Study | The Journal of Pediatrics| Volume 0 | Issue 0 |DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpeds.2018.09.054

The full article is available from the Journal of Pediatrics 

Fair Funding For Mental Health

Fair Funding For Mental Health: Putting Parity Into Practice | Institute for Public Policy Research (IPPR)

The NHS is currently in the process of writing a long-term plan that will set out what it wants to achieve with additional funding and how this funding will be allocated. This report argues that it is crucial that this plan raises our ambitions on mental health, what parity of esteem looks like and how much it will cost to get there.

The report states the NHS must scale up access to – and improve the quality of care – across all areas of treatment. In consultation with the sector, the authors identify the following themes that the long-term plan must address:

  • more investment in early intervention for children and young people (CAMHS)
  • scale up access to treatment for common mental health conditions such as
    depression and anxiety including through Improving Access to Psychological
    Therapies (IAPT)
  • provide universal high-quality community care for people severely affected
    with conditions such as psychosis, bipolar disorder, personality disorder and
    eating disorders
  • provide universal high-quality liaison and 24/7 crisis care for people living with
    poor mental health
  • reduce inpatient admissions, with more people treated in the community and
    supported at an earlier stage of their condition
  • set up a Mental Health Innovation Fund (MHIF) to spread best practise across
    the system.